Heart Attack 1/2

heart

1 : a hollow muscular organ that pumps the blood through the circulatory system by rhythmic contraction and dilation

2 : regarded as the center of a person’s thoughts and emotions, especially love or passion

at·tack

1 : to set upon with violent force

2 : the act or an instance of attacking; an assault

Passion is the enemy of precision. Forget the misnomer ‘crime of passion’. All crime is passionate. It’s passion that moves the criminal to act, to disrupt the static inertia of morality.

Daryl Zero; The Zero Effect 1998

Kevin angles the rig behind the BRT in the parking lot of the apartment complex and puts it in park with the strobes still flashing. I can see the firefighters grouped around some shrubs and by their actions I can see it’s a serious call. All scenes that we go to have a vibe and once you get used to reading body language you can usually tell how serious a call is before even getting to the patient. Bags are open, oxygen is about to be administered, clothes are being cut away, officers are asking questions of bystanders, the police dog is barking from the back seat of the K9 unit… this is a serious call.

Kevin looks over at me, “Just go, I’ll grab everything.” It’s my tech and Kevin knows I want to get to the patient and start my assessment and treatment quickly.

As I walk up to the shrubs I see an officer holding her hand on the patient’s chest. Judging by the amount of blood covering my new patient’s clothing it appears that the officer is holding direct pressure on a wound.

The fire medic is applying the oxygen mask as he looks up at me. “We just got here a second ago. Looks like a penetrating wound to the chest; maybe a stab wound. Unknown downtime; she was found a few minutes ago by a bystander.”

The bloody shirt is finally removed and I ask the officer to lift her hand briefly so I can visualize the wound. She lifts up her bloody glove and I clear off some of the blood with a dressing. I see a three centimeter horizontal stab wound just to the left of the sternum. Pushing my fingers into the chest for landmarks I find that the wound is directly over the 5th intercostal space and it’s likely the knife slipped between the ribs. Judging by the length of the wound the knife likely traveled pretty deep. Crap! That’s a bad place to miss the ribs!

I look over to the rig just as Kevin rolls the gurney next to the shrubs. “I need an Asherman and C-spine.” Kevin nods and rushes to get the supplies, returning in just a few seconds. Kevin and I tend to truncate our communication to the bare minimum on stat calls. More often than not we’re thinking the same thing and we really don’t need to verbalize most things during treatment. It makes things flow so much better when partners are on the same page and have worked together for a while.

As we cut off the rest of my patient’s bloody clothing and look for any additional wounds, I try to get a baseline on her mentation. She’s not tracking with eyes or answering questions yet she has spontaneous, erratic movement of all extremities. Actually a little too much movement – she’s slowing down our attempts to strap her to a board. I look forward to the day that we adopt a protocol that allows us to forego spinal immobilization when a patient presents with no neurological deficits. But for now we have to do it based on an abundance of precaution.

With my patient strapped down and the occlusive Asherman dressing applied, we’re ready to start transporting. It takes four of us to lift the gurney as my new patient is a bit on the obese side. I’m at the head as I push her towards the ambulance. She yells out as we lift the gurney and her big round eyes look up at me with a terrified gaze as she locks onto my eyes.

I smile down at her. “Hi, I’m KC, what’s your name?”

“Maria.”

“Maria, we’re going to the hospital because you got stabbed. I’ll ask you some more questions in a minute.” We load the gurney into the rig and I turn to Kevin before jumping in. “Code-3 trauma to Big City Trauma Center, I’ll get you vitals on the way.” Kevin nods and goes up front to drive.

I turn to the officer that was holding pressure on the wound. “She started talking just a second ago. Do you want to come with us?”

The officer gives me a big smile as she pulls off bloody gloves and tells her sergeant that she’s going to ride with us to the ED. There are usually only two reasons to take an officer with me: to get suspect information, or to witness a dying declaration. As we pull away from the apartment complex I’m hoping it’s the former. I’d really rather Maria didn’t die on me.

 

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~ by KC on March 21, 2011.

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